Mental Health: Some Reasons Why Most People Don’t Seek Help

Shame or embarrassed. Most don’t want to be labeled as “crazy.” The negative stigma about mental illnesses, is very toxic! Fear of treatment is keeping most people from seeking help. For emotional and mental health problems.

From me to you… mental illness to mental illness, mental illness to the stigma, mental illness to the people

Photo by Christina Morillo on Pexels.com

Mental illness can take on many forms: depression, anxiety, ptsd, or bipolar, ocd, and so many more. They are not weaknesses but they are diagnosed illnesses. They are illnesses. And everyone needs to start viewing them all as such.


Why many people don’t seek help or treatment…??

Not wanting to be called ‘a mental patient’ or be labeled as “psycho” or “crazy” because of all the negative stigma about mental illness. It’s not fair to judge others on situations or life circumstances, especially if you have never been through it, if you’ve never even experienced those life difficulties.

The awareness of mental illness and the need for treatment has been growing for years. This is a large part due to campaigns designed to raise awareness of addiction, depression, bipolar, suicide, as well as celebrities being open about their own mental health struggles. But even with all this, people still don’t seek help or treatment. For so many different reasons.

Making people afraid of the labeling and being told to just get over it. Being scared to be looked at as weak or unable to cope.

Reasons why most people don’t seek help or treatment.

You may think you don’t need help, or the treatment

First thing is, simply being denial. It’s all to much to comprehend… admitting you need help and seeking help. If you recognize the problem at all, you sometimes come with reasons why you don’t need help. Most be unaware that what they’re experiencing is a recognized mental health issue that can be effectively treated.

There’s practical issues

There’s so many practical reasons to why it can be hard to get mental health care. ‘Availability’ is one simply one. This is mainly true in the rural areas. Rural areas are almost always medically underserved and the situation for mental health care and addiction treatment is even worse. Mostly older people are affected by this issue since many can’t get around or sometimes most can’t drive, and have trouble getting around.

At times, another issue is paying for treatment. Although most insurers cover mental health now, but not everyone has insurance. What’s more, young adults, who are less likely to have insurance, are also at a higher risk for addiction and other mental health issues. And some low income areas face unique pressure that can increase the chances of mental illness.

Believe me, I know it can be really hard to risk precious social and professional capital to seek help. Admitting you have a problem to your friends, family, or spouse can be very difficult.

Sometimes your condition makes it hard

There’s many conditions that can make seeking treatment and help hard, for many different reasons. Even if someone with depression think change is good, is possible, finding a therapist and making an appointment may fall under the category of “impossible” tasks. — sometimes task that aren’t big deals under normal circumstances, but is unbearably difficult when you’re depressed.

What does the stigma look like…

Many people are afraid to be stigmatized if they admit that they need help, even despite the progress in recent years of bringing to the light the importance of mental health. Mental health stigma comes in many different forms. Silence, labeling, and exclusion are just a few of them.

What is stigma?

Telling someone to just snap out of it, or telling them to toughen up. Silence. Calling someone “crazy.” Treating mental illness as a misconception for the lazy or attention starved. Stigma is saying someone is “crazy” just because they have a mental illness. Calling someone “psycho” because you know they have a mental disorder… such as bipolar disorder, or schizophrenia. Believing and demanding it is all ‘in our minds.’

Where did it start?

To be honest… Society has always looked at mental illness has a sign of weakness. In the last half-century, we’ve all discovered so much more on how the brain really works.

The effect…

Those who have mental illness feel so ashamed. Majority, they hide. They do not seek help or the treatment they need. Feeling so ashamed and embarrassed, they hide it. Most not even telling family because they don’t want to be labeled as “psychotic” so all most people know is to hide it and fight it.

There’s….

14 million people die of cancer every year

25 million people have asthma

53 million people have arthritis

29.1 million people develop diabetes

61.5 million have a mental illness

What you can do…?

Talk. Listen. You can become a voice against the mental illness stigma. Spread the word that mental illness are common. Talk more about it. Learn more about the illnesses. Educate yourself, and understand that mental illness can happen to anybody. Mental illness doesn’t discriminate.


Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson

“The Rock”

My favorite wrestler, and actor… Not to mention, I always thought he was HANDSOME…

“THE ROCK.” I am so proud to say that he came out about his struggles with mental illness. He’s a big “EXAMPLE” that it can happen to anyone. He spoke out about his struggles with depression, and that depression is not a sign of weakness. He also talk about his family’s struggle with depression. Even though he’s a rich movie, with millions of dollars, it just shows that no one is perfect in this world. But most people that’s struggling with a mental illness are in a less secure position. Already being unsure about themselves, and their position in life.

The Rock have also talked about his mother’s suicide attempt when he was 15. Struggle and pain is really real. He mentioned his depression had gotten the best of him, he reached a point that he didn’t want to do anything, and he didn’t want to go anywhere. He said, “I was crying constantly.”

“I was devastated,” Johnson said.

“We all go through the sludge and depression never discriminates,” says The Rock. “Took me a long time to realize it but the key is to not be afraid to open up. Especially us dudes have a tendency to keep it in. You’re not alone.”

Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson Opens Up About His Struggles With Depression And Also His Family’s Struggle Also


For those who don’t understand mental illness, and what their negative stigma do to a person with mental illness.

When you misinterpret mental illness– and its gravity– you’re doing a whole lot of damage. Other than giving us your understanding, support, and compassion when we need it the most, you’re reinforcing our struggle.

But educating yourself can help that. Telling someone who struggle with depression and/or to ‘stop worrying’ or ‘cheer up’ is like telling someone with Lupus to simply ‘stop getting treatment.”

When you believe that ‘we’ can control our illnesses, it is so not helping it, you’re just creating more pain for us, and shame because we fail to make ourselves feel better. Those inaccurate beliefs you all have are ridiculous, and it makes it difficult for us people with a mental illness distinguish between our identity as well as our illness.

There’s one in four people experiencing a mental illness in their lifetime, but we all must know that our identities are much more important than some label or a diagnosis. That’s why saying a woman with depression, instead of saying ”a depressive” or a ”man with schizophrenia,” instead of ”a schizophrenic.” There’s a difference. Do you see and understand the difference?

We are not our diagnosis, we’re a complex, essential person coping with an illness.

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Living with a mental illness you hear things like crazy, psychotic, or deranged, which are all insults that’s unfairly used when detailing someone with a mental illness. They are all clearly inappropriate. And are offensive.

Which causes people to not get treatment. Studies found between 30 and 80 percent of people with mental health problems don’t seek treatment. This includes 50 percent of people with bipolar, 55 percent of people with panic disorder, 56 percent with major depression, and a remarkable 78 percent of people with alcohol use disorder.

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When struggling with a mental illness, self-criticism is a daily issue you deal with. The negative stigma about mental illnesses, just makes things worsen.

Believe me from experience, I know how extremely imitating it can be to tell your doctor about your problem and need a therapist. Also, having a mental illness can make it hard to seek treatment on your own initiative. This is why having a strong support system, family or friends, is very important.

Even though majority of families aren’t prepared to cope with learning that their love one has a mental illness. It can physically and emotionally trying, and can make us feel vulnerable to the opinions and judgments of others. But the most important thing to remember is… there is hope. There is help and there is treatments that all help, you just need to take that step and be strong enough to ask for help.

You are worth so much to this world, to this earth, no matter what others say. No matter what anyone tells you.

Never give up. You can beat your mental illness, you can beat anxiety, you can beat depression, you can beat bipolar disorder, you can beat anxiety. You are worth so much this world no matter what anyone tells you. You are not weak. YOU are the most important person for YOU. Stay on the path, and be very brave. You are so worth it.

Keep praying keep fighting and keep pushing, you got this and don’t ever lose focus.

No One Else Is You, & That Is Your Power

Every year people overcome the challenges of mental illness to do the things they enjoy. Through developing and following a treatment plan, you can dramatically reduce many of your symptoms. People with mental health conditions can and do pursue higher education, succeed in their careers, make friends and have relationships. Mental illness can slow us down, but we don’t need to let it stop us.

We are still ‘humans’ and the stigma needs to end.

It’s time to educating yourselves about how chemical imbalances in the brain determine mental illnesses. And then when we begin to see mental illness as a disease of the brain just like lung cancer is a disease of the lungs and arthritis is inflammation of the joints, maybe the stigma will go away.

Published by Face Depression

Hello Beautiful People, My Name Is Jackie. I Am 32yrs Old And I Have A 9yrs Old Son. Who I Love So Much!!! His Name Is Jayden. I Also Love To Write, Take Pictures,And Help Others. I Struggle With Major Depression And Anxiety On A Daily Basis But I Try Not To Let It Stop Me. God Got Me!!! I Will Keep Fighting And Keep Pushing.

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